Tag Archives: Cinea

Il Cinema Repubblica

The ‘Gentse Feesten’ (Ghent Festival), one of Europe’s biggest street festivals, hosts countless cultural events, such as concerts, (street) theater, debates and expositions. Until last year, however, a film event was lacking (although the past has seen some attempts to include open air and other film screenings). Il Cinema Repubblica now provides the Gentse Feesten with a film event to be proud of.  This four day silent film festival (17-20 July) is an initiative of the audiovisual company Republic of Reinvention, in collaboration with Cinematek (the Royal Belgian Film Archive, taking care of the film programming together with Cinea) and the School of Arts Gent (providing the beautiful historical setting of the Miry concert hall in the heart of Ghent).

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Bruno Mestdagh (Cinematek) introducing the films of Alfred Machin

All films are accompanied by live music: the first two days by musicians from the conservatory, the last two days by Hilde Nash, Cinematek’s house pianist. The first day had slapstick films, the second day served some rare copies of the Cinematek, the third day (which I attended last night) focused on the films of Alfred Machin and the fourth day combines a Chaplin classic with an early Italian feminist film and an obscure porn film from 1920. Hopefully Il Cinema Repubblica has come to stay!

Summer Film School Rotterdam

Today was the first day of the Summer Film School Rotterdam, an intensive five-day programme of lectures and film screenings organized by the cinephile platform Roffa Mon Amour in co-operation with Cinea, whose yearly Summer Film College in Antwerp served as an inspiration source. The first edition of the Summer Film School Rotterdam focuses on the work of two very different directors: the provocative American filmmaker Brian de Palma and the French ‘Rive Gauche’ director Alain Resnais. The lectures on Brian de Palma are given by film critics Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin, while Alain Resnais’s films are analyzed by film scholars Patricia Pisters (University of Amsterdam) and Nadine Boljkovac (Falmouth University).

Summer Film School

Patricia Pisters’s lecture on Alain Resnais

The Summer Film School kicked off with a very inspiring lecture by Patricia Pisters. After introducing the serious and the playful Alain Resnais, she provided us with great insights into one of the major threads throughout Resnais’s oeuvre. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze’s writings, Pisters explained the working of and reflections on time and memory in films such as Hiroshima mon amour (1959) and particularly Je t’aime je t’aime (1968). I hadn’t seen this last film yet, and it was a delightful experience (a nice extra was to see all the Belgian references in the film, as it was shot in Ostend and Brussels). After the Resnais part of the day, Cristina Álvarez López gave an excellent introduction to the early works of Brian de Palma. Adrian Martin subsequently introduced de Palma’s cult musical Phantom of the paradise (1974), which was screened afterwards.

COFIB: The End

This weekend, the very last edition of the COFIB film seminars in Neerpelt took place. The seminar focused on great ‘last films’.

Afgelopen weekend vond in het Dommelhof te Neerpelt het COFIB*-weekend plaats, een filmseminarie dat een cinefiel publiek uit Vlaanderen en Nederland verzamelt om zeven films en vier lezingen bij te wonen. Door het wegvallen van de provinciale ondersteuning was deze 65e editie ook de allerlaatste COFIB-editie (zelf kom ik er sinds 2012, vorig jaar ook als spreker). Dat is bijzonder jammer, want de filmprogrammering en de lezingen waren opnieuw uitmuntend én alle beschikbare plaatsen waren volzet.

COFIB

Bart Versteirt (Cinea) introduceert Christophe Verbiest, die een lezing gaf over Edward Yang

Erg toepasselijk kozen organisatoren Zebracinema en Cinea er voor deze laatste editie voor enkele grote filmmakers en acteurs te eren door hun laatste film te tonen: Fassbinders Querelle (1982), Edward Yangs Yi Yi (2000), Ozu’s An autumn afternoon (1962), Buñuels Cet obscur objet du désir (1977) … (bekijk hier het volledige programma) Het was een einde in schoonheid, maar de hoop blijft dat er toch nog een vervolg komt!

* COFIB staat voor ‘Cursus, Oefening, Film, Inzicht en Bespreking’ en stamt uit een tijd (jaren 1960-1970) waarin er te Neerpelt wel meer dergelijke acroniemen geboren werden, zoals het NIVWF (Nationaal Instituut voor de Verspreiding van de Waardevolle Film) of Figator (Filminleider en gespreksanimator, een titel met bijhorend diploma die men kon verwerven na enkele COFIB-seminaries te hebben gevolgd).

Summer Film College 2017

Last week, Cinea (the Flemish Service for Film Culture) organized its yearly Summer Film College (Zomerfilmcollege) in Cinema Zuid in Antwerp. I’ve been attending the Summer Film College since 2009, when it was still taking place in Bruges, and it’s always a pleasure to dive into this week with each day from morning until midnight lectures and films … a true celebration of cinephilia indeed!

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Bart Versteirt (Cinea) interviewing Iranian director Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa about her autobiographical documentary Jerry and Me (2013)

This year’s Summer Film College was dedicated to two themes: the great Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami and US comedy films from the 1930s and 1940s. You can consult the full programme here. Unfortunately, I was only able to attend the two last days, but the lectures by Ruben Demasure, Adrian Martin and Tom Paulus were simply excellent and I enjoyed seeing Trouble in Paradise (1932, Ernst Lubitsch) and Kiarostami’s posthumously finished last film 24 Frames (2017) a lot. Looking forward to next year’s edition!

Day for night

Anke Brouwers

Anke Brouwers introducing Days of Heaven

This weekend, the first edition of Day for night took place, a 24-hour film marathon organized by Cinea, KASKcinema and the Ghent University film club Film-Plateau. With nine films, six introductions, and just very tiny breaks in-between, it may look like a lot of unnecessary suffering for some, but for true cinephiles watching John Ford’s She wore a yellow ribbon, Alfred Hitchcock’s To catch a thief and Terrence Malick’s Days of heaven in a row just feels like… well, like a day and night of heaven.

Dorst naar bloed

French and Dutch-language poster for Daughters of Darkness

I gave an introduction to Harry Kümel’s 1971 Daughters of Darkness, a terrific vampire cult film which succeeds in making the bridge between arthouse and exploitation cinema. Afterwards, the night program continued with Toute une nuit (1982, Chantal Akerman), Night on earth (1991, Jim Jarmusch, 1991), Demoni (1985, Lamberto Bava) and Die hard (1988, John McTiernan). The closing film of the weekend was F.W. Murnau’s beautiful silent film Sunrise (1927).

Wouter Hessels

Wouter Hessels introducing Sunrise

dinner

Appropriate dinner for a film marathon…